we+ recycles styrofoam waste into dark, monolithic furniture


we+ simplifies recycling processes with styrofoam furniture

 

Following the debut of their Urban Origin collection with the Haze copper wire series, contemporary Tokyo-based design studio we+ returns with the second series of the collection, Refoam. Giving form to new perspectives and values through the design project, Refoam presents recycled styrofoam furniture pieces, including tables, stools and benches, that attempt to reframe today’s inappropriate and overly complex relationship between humans and materials. The project transforms a typical recycling process into a new way of manufacturing furniture. Adopting a more simplified, efficient and environmentally conscious recycling process, we+ eliminates the need for transportation of materials and products for recycling and manufacturing. Instead, the project tackles a mountain of styrofoam waste in Tokyo, to metamorphose it into new usable products — directly on site of an intermediate treatment plant.

we+ transforms recycling processes to revalue styrofoam waste into monolithic furniture
all images by Masayuki Hayashi

 

 

refoam assigns new values to styrofoam waste 

 

we+’s Urban Origin research project considers the origins of the overly complicated manufacturing processes in modern day society, and reevaluates the mass waste produced by cities as indigenous materials. The new Refoam project returns to the starting point of the relationship between humans and materials — using vernacular materials and treating them simply with our own hands — and explores new values for styrofoam. The furniture collection takes form from recycled waste styrofoam that is collected and repurposed in Tokyo, materializing as dark, minimal, monolithic benches, stools, and tables that retain the texture of compressed styrofoam. By considering Tokyo as the origin of used materials, the Japanese design studio simplifies the recycling process by manufacturing furniture directly from waste as an end product on the intermediate treatment plant site, giving a completely different value to the material.

we+ transforms recycling processes to revalue styrofoam waste into monolithic furniture
we+ returns with the second series of the Urban Origin collection with Refoam

 

 

the second series of the urban origin collection

 

In Tokyo and its suburbs, styrofoam is commonly melted into ingots in intermediate treatment plants, then exported to Europe and Southeast Asia. Here. they are transformed into granules and then into inexpensive recycled products, mainly from China. In Japan, these products are typically sold in 100-yen shops.

 

Although recycling rates are high, the process remains very complex. Further, the process and scale of transportation between countries remains vastly damaging to the environment, and time and energy consuming. With Refoam, we+ therefore explores the possibility of using intermediate treatment plants to directly manufacture furniture as an end product, instead of ingots which are transported around the globe to manufacturing sites.

we+ transforms recycling processes to revalue styrofoam waste into monolithic furniture
the furniture collection recycles and repurposes waste styrofoam that is collected in Tokyo

we+ transforms recycling processes to revalue styrofoam waste into monolithic furniture
the dark, minimal, monolithic benches, stools, and tables retain the texture of compressed styrofoam



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Radical Ruggism, Design after Capitalism, MINI Concept + More


It’s not always necessary to throw out the baby with the bath water when it comes to designs that have attained iconic standards. And the MINI is definitely one of those vehicles that is instantly recognizable even at glance even now numerous iterative generations into its existence. The brand’s newest all-electric MINI Crossover SAV concept hits all the marks in keeping those identifiably MINI-ish qualities, while updating it with some sleek detailing. I mean check out those cool color combinations, many obviously inspired by current interior decor trends. Extra points for its uninhibited funky interior cabin that isn’t afraid to lean into “fun” rather than merely “futuristic.” Bravo, MINI!

As someone whose earlier design career first weaved through the video games, then the toy industry, I’m very well acquainted with the essential nature of the collaborative process in designing anything for scale, whether physical or digital. No designer operates as an island unto themselves, especially when quantities are measured in hundreds of thousands. But this cooperative approach tends to be fairly insular, self-contained to designing, manufacturing, and marketing. Matthew Wizinsky’s book Design After Capitalism proposes to extend this cooperative and collaborative process toward a more holistic and equitable economy, with design entrepreneurship taking the lead in taking responsibility of not only how something is made, but also what is designed in the first place. The culmination of chapters eventually leads to spelling out solutions, laying paths towards breaking away from failing standards, and reorienting design towards “both a horizon and a journey.”

For a short and sweet moment, I had convinced myself we were going to buy and live in a home in the Central California coast demarcated by its unusual amalgamation of 80s Southwestern architectural detailing hinting of Post Modern-era decor. Alas, the house sold before we were ready to buy, but the dreams of a colorfully irreverent decor scheme remain. If one day we’re lucky to find ourselves decorating a space that says, “go totally radical, dude!,” I’d be apt to decorate every room with numerous rugs from Ruggism’s two artist-inspired collections.

Not going to lie, a small part of the reason I am fond of this furniture studio is probably related to positive feelings I associate with the Indian flatbread of the same name. That said, I’ve been on a hunt to find a long and low media console to furnish our living room. This Spain-based furniture company specializing in sustainable wood furniture hits the mark in both design and pricing (even when factoring in the shipping costs). I’m envisioning a pair of these fresquera lattice-design media consoles stretching across our living room, emphasizing the horizontal plane while also giving some surface area for a television, turntable, audio speakers, and lighting while hiding other componentry.

As happy as we are as first time homeowners, we realize we have a daunting task ahead of us in the goal of revitalizing the spirit of a mid-century 1960s built residence, one thick with layers of questionable and dated 1980s/1990s treatments we’ll need to replace and update. One thing that we do love about our home is the original wood paneling, a common interior feature of the era. The vertical design is something we hope to echo by utilizing something like these modern day acoustic slat wood wall panels which aren’t merely an aesthetic solution, but also dampen acoustics. Installation seems reasonable for a seasoned and motivated DIYer with the right tools, and the results are impressively architectural versus merely paintings or wallpapering surfaces.

This post contains affiliate links, so if you make a purchase from an affiliate link, we earn a commission. Thanks for supporting Design Milk!

Gregory Han is Tech Editor of Design Milk. A Los Angeles native with a profound love and curiosity for design, hiking, tide pools, and road trips, a selection of his adventures and musings can be found at gregoryhan.com.



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The Woods WeHo Opens an Eco-Zen, Buzz-Worthy Dispensary


Not all dispensaries are created equal, which is noticed at first glance of The Woods WeHo. The high-end dispensary located off of Santa Monica Boulevard in West Hollywood has what they’ve described as a “eco-zen” vibe. Tasked by The Woods’ co-founders actor + activist Woody Harrelson, comedian Bill Maher, and ERBA Markets co-founders Devon Wheeler and Jay Handal with designing the new shop, Creative Director Thomas Schoos of Schoos Design created a sustainable oasis you could get lost in. The chill, laid back aesthetic has a woodsy, organic feel, which makes sense given the name.

interior shot of cannabis store with wood accents and greenery

An oval-shaped counter made of recycled wood from a Montana barn makes the biggest statement in the space, along with loads of greenery of the basic plant variety. Arched bookshelves hold court with the various types of cannabis offerings on display.

interior shot of cannabis store with wood accents and greenery

interior shot of cannabis store with wood accents and greenery and counter for paying

interior shot of cannabis store with wood accents and greenery with shelves of product

Feng shui dragons from Thailand hang from the ceiling while holding energy efficient LED bulbs at varying heights.

interior shot of cannabis store with wood accents and greenery with shelves of product

interior shot of cannabis store with wood accents and greenery

interior shot of cannabis store with wood accents and greenery and built-in shelf with lit products

angled interior shot of cannabis dispensary with clay coated walls featuring cutouts acting as shelves

Embedded porthole windows made of clay act as open shelves with views to the upcoming bar concept soon to open on the other side.

interior shot of cannabis store with wood accents and greenery

Skylights keep the interior well lit and the ficus and fiddle-leaf fig trees happy and growing.

closeup of interior of cannabis shop shelf with range of products

interior shot of cannabis store with wood accents and greenery with shot of arched shelving with products

Custom shelving holds curated offerings within marble and wooden cubes with porthole windows that let customers view the goods.

interior shot of cannabis store with wood accents and greenery with closeup of arched shelf with products

closeup of cannabis products in box looking through glass

closeup of cannabis products in box looking through glass

closeup of cannabis products in box looking through glass

closeup of cannabis products in box looking through glass

closeup of cannabis products in box looking through glass

exterior shot of front door of cannabis shop in WeHo

Visit The Woods dispensary at 8271 Santa Monica Blvd. in West Hollywood, California. More info here.

Photos by Diana Dalsasso.

Caroline Williamson is Editorial Director of Design Milk. She has a BFA in photography from SCAD and can usually be found searching for vintage wares, doing New York Times crossword puzzles in pen, or reworking playlists on Spotify.





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The Al Dente Collection by Caleb Ferris Is Better Than Carbs


Cavatappi, Lasagne, Ravioli, Lumache – these are typically the names you find in the pasta section of the grocery store but today, they refer to the Al Dente collection designed by artist and designer Caleb Ferris. Not only is the collection inspired by the world of pasta, the production methods used to bring the collection to life is not dissimilar to the way pasta is made, whether that process is hand-made, machine-made, or a combination of the two.

cavatappi coffee table

cavatappi coffee table

The collection consists of a Cavatappi coffee table, a Lasagne side table, a ceramic Ravioli bowl, and a Lumache Object. While the pieces’ namesakes are often mass-manufactured, these one-of-a-kind objects were designed to make us pause and appreciate what already exists. 

cavatappi coffee table

cavatappi coffee table

cavatappi coffee table

lasagne side table

lasagne side table

lasagne side table

lasagne side table

lasagne side table

ravioli bowl

ravioli bowl

ravioli bowl

ravioli bowl

ravioli bowl

ravioli bowl

Lumache Object

Lumache Object

Lumache Object

Lumache Object

Lumache Object

pasta-inspired furniture

For more information visit calebferris.com.

As the Lifestyle editor, Vy Yang is obsessed with discovering ways to live well + with intention through design. She’s probably sharing what she finds over on Instagram stories. You can also find her at vytranyang.com.





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The Crochet Rug Collection Is Inspired by the Designer’s Mother


Stitched to perfection, Clara Von Zweigbergk shows us that the art of crochet can be made modern in this rug collection for GAN. Appropriately called The Crochet Collection, the series of virgin wool, oval rugs handmade in India add color and texture in the same way a knitted shawl does to an outfit.

crochet rug in living room

von Zweigbergk was inspired by her own mother who taught her to sew and knit from a young age. She combines her talents in graphic design and illustration with her experience in the art of knitting to create the collection of four contemporary rug designs. The Crochet Mono is 39” x 5’11” and comes in blue, pink, and beige color ways.The Crochet Trio unites the individual rugs in a single rug, combining colors and arches to create a vibrant, graphic effect.

crochet rug upclose

crochet rug upclose

crochet rug upclose

crochet rug upclose

crochet rug upclose

crochet rug upclose

crochet rug upclose

crochet rug upclose

crochet rug upclose

crochet rug in dining room

crochet rug in dining room

crochet rug in hallway

As the Lifestyle editor, Vy Yang is obsessed with discovering ways to live well + with intention through design. She’s probably sharing what she finds over on Instagram stories. You can also find her at vytranyang.com.





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A Minimalist Swiss Penthouse Designed Like the Interior of a Boat


Celerina Penthouse is a minimal home located in Engadin, Switzerland, designed by Nenmar. The penthouse is part of a 1940’s building in the upper part of the village close to St. Moritz, and enjoys comparatively more sunlight than the neighboring towns within Engadin.

As such, priority was given to maximizing natural light throughout the home, while also providing a space that would allow for entertaining guests without constraint. Nenmar’s approach was to consider each room as though it were the interior of a boat, wherein every empty or full space would be made into a functional space.

Features of interest, such as the existing structural beams, were expressed in a contemporary manner. Fixed and soft furnishings were made-to-measure in order to further maximize space, while the timber throughout the property was sourced from an old barn that was being dismantled and restored to its original finish.

interior shot of light-filled penthouse apartment with light woods and white surfaces

interior shot of light-filled penthouse apartment with light woods and white surfaces with white l-shaped sofa

interior shot of light-filled penthouse apartment with light woods and white surfaces

interior shot of light-filled penthouse apartment with light woods and white surfaces

interior shot of light-filled penthouse apartment with light woods and white surfaces

interior shot of light-filled penthouse apartment with light woods and white surfaces

interior shot of light-filled penthouse apartment with light woods and white surfaces

interior shot of light-filled penthouse apartment with light woods and white surfaces

interior shot of gray bathroom with minimalist walls

Photos by DSL Studio.

Leo Lei translates his passion for minimalism into his daily-updated blog Leibal. In addition, you can find uniquely designed minimalist objects and furniture at the Leibal Store.



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dassault systemes exemplifies eco-design with e-flow air purifier-plus-light


tony parez-edo martin x dassault systemes’ e-flow air purifier

 

If the COVID-19 pandemic taught designers one thing, it is the importance of working from home and the ability to collaborate online, exchange and share ideas, and maintain business continuity. With the world opening up again, family and friends are mixing together and being welcomed into these personal spaces once more. The need for a safe, clean and healthy home and work space is more important than ever now. Tony Parez-Edo Martin – an industrial designer and founder of Paredo Studio – enhanced the Dassault Systemes 3DEXPERIENCE platform on the cloud to create an innovative concept of an air purifier, named e-flow. The design disguises its air purification and ventilation functionalities as a kinetic chandelier.

 

My design work searches for innovative answers to environmental and social issues, topics such as urban medical mobility, which I touched upon in the e-way rescue roadster project in 2021. Since the first IPCC [Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change] report, we are used to hearing about air quality in urban areas, but the pandemic has promoted us to take an interest in what comes and stays in our homes, in the air we breath inside, for a whole family or a coworking space,’ begins Tony Parez-Edo Martin in an exclusive interview with designboom.

dassault systemes exemplifies eco-design with e-flow air purifier-plus-chandelier
Created with Dassault Systemes, the e-flow air purifier was designed by Tony Parez-Edo Martin

All images courtesy of Tony Parez-Edo Martin and Dassault Systemes

 

 

an air purifier that doubles as an animated chandelier

 

Suspended from the ceiling, the e-flow air purifier seemingly floats statically or cinematically above the room, offering a functional or relaxing light atmosphere. Two tiers of fin-shaped arms move smoothly as air is drawn into its lower filtration system, purified and then dispersed from its upper fins. This provides homogeneous ventilation in the room through the arms’ movement.

dassault systemes exemplifies eco-design with e-flow air purifier-plus-chandelier
The concept of the ventilation system inside the home

 

 

The user does not want a product to constantly warn them of the presence of a virus, but it needs to make inhabitants feel safe,’ explains the designer. ‘The idea was to subtly disguise its functionality through a light system. It combines universal air purification with a light system. Like a chandelier hanging from the ceiling, its position is ideal to legitmize both ventilation and illumination.

dassault systemes exemplifies eco-design with e-flow air purifier-plus-chandelier
Luminous LED totems cap the fin-like arms to illuminate the room

 

 

Looking at its skeletal form, it is apparent how the air purifier was shaped organically. The shapes and movement of nature directly influenced its ideation. The poetic result mirrors the forms seen in the architectural work of Santiago Calatrava, Zaha Hadid and Antoni Gaudí. The Calatrava-designed Umbracle – a curved walkway in Valencia with shaded forms designed to protect biodiversity – emphasizes its comparison.

Video of architecture / nature / mathematic inspiration on the 3DEXPERIENCE Cloud platform

 

 

The design sources inspiration from nature, mathematics and architecture to be quite poetic and emotive in its dynamic appearance. The likes of Santiago Calatrava, Zaha Hadid and Antoni Gaudí inspired the design but not only. I worked with a new application of Dassault Systemes 3DEXPERIENCE platform on the cloud which is a topological optimization with airflow. It is a software that generates the forms through the simulation of air flow and input parameters, which I then shaped into different designs. It was poetic how the initial form was so organic and shared a likeness with the work of these famous architects,’ clarifies Tony.

dassault systemes exemplifies eco-design with e-flow air purifier-plus-chandelier
The 3DEXPERIENCE platform is a unified system that can be use from ideation through to manufacturing

 

 

dassault systemes accelerates ideation from sketch to 3D

 

Inspiration was harnessed and quickly transformed into design ideas. The intuitive natural sketch app and 3D sketch tools were used to create concept volumes in 3D, which makes it easier to show intent to collaborators. 3D pattern shape creator explored styling patterns using powerful algorithmic generative modelling. The undulating upper and lower surfaces, for example, took form using a digital modelling application.

Video of 3D sketches concepts

 

 

I always start with 3D sketches to ideate different innovation axis such as modularity, sustainability, biomimicry, kinetic principles or nomadic uses. I moved quickly into 3D with the CATIA Creative Design applications, where 3D curves enable me to create first geometries, go back and modify surface intuitively. I find this a very comfortable way to explore designs,’ adds the designer.

dassault systemes exemplifies eco-design with e-flow air purifier-plus-chandelier
Requirements of mechanical, electrical and other systems can be understood through the platform

 

 

Through Tony’s innovative work, the designer often trials and tests new software developments on the Dassault Systemes 3DEXPERIENCE platform on the cloud, working with the company’s experts, engineers and other designers. The platform was used for the whole design development of the e-flow. Its complete set of tools enabled the designer to imagine, sketch and validate the air purifier, even understanding its requirements of mechanical, electrical and other systems.

dassault systemes exemplifies eco-design with e-flow air purifier-plus-chandelier
Dassault Systemes’ platform offers a look inside the e-flow air purifier

 

 

The first goal of this project wasn’t to test tools, it was to have fun and explore the possibilities of an idea,’ explains Tony. ‘This project did help me keep updated with new technologies from Dassault Systemes, though. They have a lot of great engineers that are combining technologies to evolve applications. With the cloud, over-the-air updates add new enhancements to the creator’s toolbox. One important new tool I tested was the flow driver on generative design. It was perfect to help design an air purifier because it is an airflow simulation.

dassault systemes exemplifies eco-design with e-flow air purifier-plus-chandelier
The system enables the ability to create and collaborate anywhere with other designers, engineers and stakeholders

 

 

The impressive, ever-evolving toolbox of the 3DEXPERIENCE platform is enhanced through its multi-domain, cloud-based nature. The system enables the ability to create and collaborate anywhere with other designers, engineers and stakeholders. Accessed by the cloud, any collaborator with internet can create, visualize or test a project. This enables designers like Tony to quickly and easily move from ideation through to real-time visualization and assembly design.

 

The 3DEXPERIENCE platform is very powerful, from webservices like 3D printing to collaborative possibilities. creators can create and communicate on the cloud in a very nomadic, modern way. I spent three weeks working on this project in Cape Town, South Africa,’ notes the designer.

dassault systemes exemplifies eco-design with e-flow air purifier-plus-chandelier
Simulation technologies validate ideas to inform better decisions throughout the design process

 

 

simulations that validate sustainable design decisions

 

Tony Parez-Edo Martin’s e-flow air purifier shows the possibilities of conceptualizing forward-thinking designs quickly and efficiently, from ideation through to production. Simulation technologies validate ideas to inform better decisions throughout the design process. The topological optimization allowed the designer to create a more lightweight, organic shape. Sustainable materials were selected whilst adhering to performance needs.

 

Creators can design everything on the same cloud platform. Dassault Systemes has a library of sustainable materials researched, so the air purifier can be 3D printed in bio-plastic. It adds to the identity of the project by mixing poetry, sustainability and technology. 3D printing enables more freedom as it create shapes that are not possible with injection molding, all whilst choosing the material that is the most lightweight. It is not just sustainable, it is functional as a chandelier,’ concludes Tony Parez-Edo Martin in an exclusive interview with designboom.

dassault systemes exemplifies eco-design with e-flow air purifier-plus-chandelier
The topological optimization software aided the designer to create the first form using airflow



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‘the metamorphosis of beautiful bodies’ by kumi kaguraoka


‘the metamorphosis of beautiful bodies’ by kumi kaguraoka 

 

Just like physical strength, intelligence, and property, beauty standards have always been deeply rooted in power and survival. Taking this statement as the starting point of her new project, artist Kumi Kaguraoka presents ‘The Metamorphosis of Beautiful Bodies,’ poignant commentary investigating how the human body has been subjected to past and present aesthetic dogmas. The artwork also looks to possible evolutions of these beauty standards 1,000 years from now.

 

After careful research, Kaguraoka created a series of wearable devices and body casts that help reconstruct and reshape one’s physique. These recall very real techniques adopted in certain parts of the world; foot binding in China, corsets in the West, neck-extending brass rings in tribal cultures, and cranial deformation.

 

‘I chose this theme because I felt uncomfortable with Japan’s post-colonial identity and the aesthetic values presented by society. For example, the anime characters I admired as a kid have small faces, tall and slender bodies, blond hair, and big eyes. However, as I researched several fashion trends, folk costumes, cultures, and religions, I found that various body shapes were set as the ‘ideal: where does this aesthetic value come from, and where is it going in the future? These body casts I created raise noses, prevent crooked backs and enable one to walk like a model. These are all easy to wear for Japanese women with average heights and weights and function as casts to shape their bodies,’ writes the artist.

kumi kaguraoka explores beauty standards with her body-reconstructing devices

‘The Metamorphosis of Beautiful Bodies’ 

 

 

strong, tall, and slender: the future ideal? 

 

Setting aside past and present realities, Kumi Kaguraoka also realized ‘The Metamorphosis of Beautiful Bodies’ with the future in mind. Although nobody truly knows what will happen by then, the artist believes it’s possible to hypothesize and predict new values and notions based on her research exploring how beauty has been conceptualized through environments, histories, and cultures. This reflection prompted her to outline several possible scenarios for life on earth a millennium later.

 

First, an essential factor to consider is how our living environment will look 1,000 years from now. If we live on the moon, beauty values may depend on gravity. Second, what to eat may vary significantly by habitat, which affects the physique. And third, the earth is likely to suffer from severe global warming by then — with water scarcity and dry lands dominating continents — a strong determinant for the type of clothing we will be wearing. ‘Such a tough scenario predicted urges to ponder how a sense of beauty will be situated and what will be considered as beauty throughout the years to come,’ she notes. 

kumi kaguraoka explores beauty standards with her body-reconstructing devices

body casts that reconstruct / extend the limbs 

 

 

Taking these possible futures into consideration, the artist hypothesizes that one of the future notions of ‘beauty’ will be based how strong our bodies will be to survive. The physique, therefore, may ultimately be considered one of the ideal values for humans.

 

Specifically, she borrowed the physique of North Africa’s Dinka people to prototype her average human body of the future: 180 centimeters tall, with a small face and slender limbs. Speculating that such a body would be the ideal shape, the artist realized that the average Japanese woman would require considerable vertical growth. This is where her body casts, called ‘extended bones,’ will come into play.

 

‘As humans always search for new lands, challenge tougher conditions, weave the unbelievable history of human evolution for millions of years, we will continue to pursue the notion of ‘beauty’ and will surely be able to generate new values with new technologies and materials along the way,’ concludes Kumi Kaguraoka. 

 

 

kumi kaguraoka explores beauty standards with her body-reconstructing devices 

 

 



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meyer manx reimagines iconic 60s dune buggy as modern EV


nostalgia, electrified

 

In 1964, Californian engineer, artist, boat builder, and surfer Bruce Meyers utilized his expertise to create the first fiberglass dune buggy, sparking a fad for off-road riding. Called the Meyers Manx, the groundbreaking creation became an icon for both its playful design and its astounding performance. The vehicle dominated dune races in its day, breaking records immediately, and also caused a sensation in Hollywood when it was driven by Steve McQueen in the Thomas Crown Affair and by Elvis Presley in Live a Little, Love a Little.

 

Nearly 60 years after, the Meyer Manx company revives the emblematic go-anywhere buggy with an electrified version — the Meyers Manx 2.0 Electric. This first-of-its-kind EV captures the original’s true feel and legacy while being recreated for the modern day with an ecologically responsible mentality.

meyer manx reimagines iconic 60s dune buggy as contemporary electric off-roader
the Meyers Manx 2.0 Electric

all images courtesy of Meyer Manx

 

 

coming in 2023

 

The Meyers Manx 2.0 Electric follows the original design closely, although it is a touch more refined than its predecessor. The new EV has a light curb weight of 1,500 lbs (680 kg) while its proportions are identical to the original. The vehicle will be available with a base 20 kWh battery with a range of 150 miles or an optional 40 kWh battery with a range of 300 miles. The lithium-ion pouch cells are housed next to two motors and an inverter, while the gear train is tucked behind the original’s rear bodywork, which was built around an air-cooled engine. The company promises 202 horsepower and up to 240 pound-feet of torque.

 

The electric buggy is expected to go into production in 2023. The first 50 pre-production cars will be distributed to people whose experiences and data collection will help make the production car the best it can be. Beta customers will be expected to drive their cars in all types of conditions for a pre-assigned minimum mileage over a 12-month period and will be discussing their findings on a regular basis with the Meyers Manx team. ‘This rigorous testing methodology mirrors that of our founder, Bruce Meyers, who set the Baja speed record with his prototype buggy Old Red.’ the Meyer Manx team shares. 

meyer manx reimagines iconic 60s dune buggy as contemporary electric off-roader
the EV captures the original’s true legacy while being recreated for the modern day with an ecologically responsible mentality

meyer manx reimagines iconic 60s dune buggy as contemporary electric off-roader
Meyer Manx 2.0 follows the original design closely, although it is a touch more refined than its predecessor

iconic meyer manx dune buggy from the 60s makes comeback as contemporary EV
the original Meyer Manx dune buggy from the 60s

 

 

project info: 

 

name: Meyers Manx 2.0 Electric
company: Meyer Manx

myrto katsikopoulou I designboom

aug 11, 2022



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olson kundig completes ‘caddy shack’ in austin, texas


‘caddy shack’ in austin hovers over a challenging terrain

 

A home for a former professional golfer overlooking Austin, Texas, ‘Caddy Shack’ by Olson Kundig elegantly navigates the constraints of its challenging site. From the main entrance at the top of the hill, the landscape drops away almost immediately, morphing from a suburban neighborhood to a steep, rocky ravine. Reveling in this condition, the dwelling hovers over the rugged terrain to capture sweeping views of the surrounding landscape and Austin skyline beyond.

 

The heart of this project is the client. He was able to look beyond a challenging site and see that we had an opportunity to make something extraordinary. That sense of adventure and risk-taking really informed the spirit of the home. We were able to very surgically insert the house into the ravine, leaving the landscape in its natural state as much as possible‘ shares Tom Kundig, FAIA, RIBA, Design Principal. 

corten steel bridges reach for the austin skyline in this new olson kundig residence

all images © Aaron Leitz (unless stated otherwise)

 

 

pushing familiar materials and architecture to their extremes 

 

At the public, street-facing side of ‘Caddy Shack,’ an extended, low profile creates a bridge across the landscape, framing glimpses of the hillside below its central volume. Rusted steel siding harmonizes with the neutral colors of the surrounding brush and rocks and allows the home to balance dual impressions of strength and lightness.

 

To echo this expression, the team at Olson Kundig made room for a garage punctuated by clerestory windows capturing natural light. Inside it, a workstation provides dedicated space for the client to tune his clubs.

 

A steel catwalk and custom entry door painted blue open onto a generous main living space, which features a full-height window wall overlooking the ravine. A hand-operated wheel allows the wall to partially lower and becomes a guardrail, with exposed counterweights celebrating this kinetic element. Unifying the attached kitchen and dining room is a custom light installation that illuminates and enlivens all at once. 

corten steel bridges reach for the austin skyline in this new olson kundig residence

‘Caddy Shack’ barely touches the terrain to keep the landscape as intact as possible

 

 

Throughout, wooden floors and ceilings are complemented by blackened steel accents, fostering a warm and comfortable interior. This environment easily transitions outwards where a generous deck with a pool and hot tub welcome owners. A thick panel of clear acrylic at the far end of the pool creates additional views of the water.

 

Moreover, an adjacent, cantilevering wing houses a powder room and study, as well as a custom staircase made of bent and hemmed steel with perforated panels. This treatment is repeated in the custom, built-in elements throughout the powder room and study, including a bent steel vanity and sink, trophy case, and desk. corten steel bridges reach for the austin skyline in this new olson kundig residence

offering expansive views from the private suites 

 

 

And finally, a hallway and master suite just beyond frame expansive views and link to a narrow steel catwalk that extends over the ravine, providing a unique visual experience. Below the suite, a guest room takes advantage of the empty volume between home and hillside, hanging suspended from above. Finally, additional spaces for guests on the upper-most level offer views across the roof of the master room to the city. 

 

‘Caddy Shack pushes familiar materials and strategies to their extremes – the branching wings, the cantilever, the light touch on the land. This project tests our research and development efforts by exploring those outer limits’, concludes Tom Kundig. 



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