All posts by Kim Howard

Kristina Dam’s Edo Side Table Is Made of Cardboard + Fabric


Celebrating her eponymous studio’s 10th anniversary, designer Kristina Dam collaborates with Danish paper artist Amanda Betz and Danish manufacturer ELVO (known for their cardboard boxes) on the Edo Side Table, a piece of furniture that’s durable and steady despite being made of just cardboard, fabric, and a few pins.

Kristina Dam Edo paper side table

Dam, who studied at The Royal Danish School of Fine Arts, Architecture, and Design in Copenhagen, was taught that if a product is durable as a paper prototype, then it will be durable in construction and execution. She has since wanted to experiment in paper or cardboard and realized her goals with the Edo. The side table, inspired by the art of simple living, is foldable and best suited for bedsides, narrow hallways, and small spaces. It comes in an earthy Burnt Brown and neutral cool Grey.

Kristina Dam Edo paper side table

Kristina Dam Edo paper side table

Kristina Dam Edo paper side table

Kristina Dam Edo paper side table

Kristina Dam Edo paper side table

Kristina Dam Edo paper side table

To learn more, visit kristinadam.dk.

As the Lifestyle editor, Vy Yang is obsessed with discovering ways to live well + with intention through design. She’s probably sharing what she finds over on Instagram stories. You can also find her at vytranyang.com.





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Ledoux Shelving Is Modular Like You’ve Never Seen Before


One of the most unique pieces of modular furniture we’ve seen yet, Piscina’s abstract Ledoux shelving system can be effortlessly rearranged over and over again. (We first talked abut it back in our Best of ICFF 2022 post.) The “spine” of the shelving is a boxy column with grooves – inspired by French Neoclassical architect Claud Nicolas Ledoux – that holds the shelves in place. At the moment, there are ten different solid wood shelf designs that can be easily slipped into place and reconfigured on the main column whenever the urge strikes. Speaking of the column, it can be made to order at any height you wish alongside a customized selection of shelves.

modular wood shelving styled as an office

Ledoux was designed by Cuban-American artist Natalie Shook, founder of Piscina, and developed in collaboration with her husband and architect, Wes Rozen. Piscina is a collective that sits next to the brand’s studio. Shook wanted to provide a place where designers who hold a shared dedication to quality craft and innovation could gather. Piscina represents the work of these artists and the work of other designers whose work appeals to their art and design aesthetic.

detail of modular wood shelving

modular wood shelving styled as an office

modular wood shelving styled as an office

modular wood shelving styled with books and objects

modular wood shelving styled with books and objects

detail of modular wood shelving

modular wood shelving styled with books and objects

detail of modular wood shelving

modular wood shelving styled with books and objects

modular wood shelving styled with table and stools

modular wood shelving styled with stools

detail of modular wood shelving

detail of modular wood shelving

detail of modular wood shelving

detail of modular wood shelving

detail of modular wood shelving

To learn more about Ledoux Shelving, visit piscinapiscina.com.

Photography by Jason LeCras.

Kelly Beall is senior editor at Design Milk. The Pittsburgh-based graphic designer and writer has had a deep love of art and design for as long as she can remember, and enjoys sharing her finds with others. When undistracted by great art and design, she can be found making a mess in the kitchen, consuming as much information as possible, or on the couch with her three pets. Find her @designcrush on social.



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The Hotel Greystone Gives Nod to Its Art Deco Past


Hotel Greystone is a minimal boutique hotel located in Miami, Florida, designed by the Salt Hotels team along with Bowen Holly. Originally built in 1939, the building is one of architect Henry Hohauser’s iconic contributions to the area. The conversion created 91 rooms and suites, which include a number of penthouse suites with private terraces.

The art deco reception serves as an expression of Miami Beach’s history

The art deco reception serves as an expression of Miami Beach’s past, present, and future. The intimate lobby is reciprocated in the guest rooms through the use of muted neutral tones and Scandinavian furniture. Art and design melt together to create a tranquil space.

Holly Muhl of Bowen Holly led the interior design, “Our goal was to create something stylish and comfortable that evokes the dynamic layers of Miami Beach. The building offers so many opportunities for a sophisticated audience depending on your mood and we wanted every space to give guests a welcome and authentic sense of place.”

Suite featuring neutral tones and ambient lighting

A Wishbone chair seen in the penthouse suite

Guest room with Wishbone chairs by Carl Hansen

The art deco reception serves as an expression of Miami Beach’s history

A minimalist reception welcomes guests

The penthouse suite features Scandinavian furniture and neutral tones

Guest room with Wishbone chairs by Carl Hansen

The art deco facade serves as an expression of Miami Beach’s history

Photos courtesy of Hotel Greystone.

Leo Lei translates his passion for minimalism into his daily-updated blog Leibal. In addition, you can find uniquely designed minimalist objects and furniture at the Leibal Store.



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100architects’ winding plazas enliven corniche in UAE


100architects activates uae beach corniche

 

Along the stretch of the Beach Corniche in the UAE, 100architects positions Winding Breeze — a conceptual bustling community hub for both the local community and tourists of the emirates. The project proposes a system of vibrant elevated pathways, looping across the corniche to contain pocketed plazas hosting a range of leisure amenities. Wound within are entertainment spaces, sports and play areas, beach facilities and restaurants and cafes that enliven the coastline. A new trendy outdoor lifestyle hub, Winding Breeze’s cluster of high-quality entertainment activities aims to enhance visitors’ experience in the public realm, providing a place to reconnect with nature and the community. The architects intend for the hub to become an urban landmark not only in the UAE, but also beyond.

100architects winding pathways and entertainment plazas enliven corniche in sharjah
all images courtesy of 100architects

 

 

swirling pathways pocket vibrant entertainment plazas

 

Aiming to build a new urban landmark in the UAE, the Shanghai-based firm brings together a series of a vibrant outdoor lifestyle facilities positioned along the idyllic coastline, forming relaxing and enlivened spaces where visitors can reconnect with nature and the community. In a sweeping abstract expression of the wind, Winding Breeze takes form as vibrant, swirling, elevated pedestrian paths. Creating a microclimate underneath, the resulting plazas host a shaded park and a beach skywalk that offers panoramic views across both the beach and city. The complex also facilitates a pedestrian connection to the urban settlement across the road that is currently separated from the coast.

 

‘The conceptual proposal intends a bold architecturalization of that unique feeling of the sea breeze caressing the skin when arriving at a bespoke tourist destination on holiday’, comments 100architects. The elevated ‘breeze loops’ of Winding Breeze spiral along the beach and disrupt the expansive rectilinear promenade into smaller human-scale sections. Formed by these revolving paths are a series of ‘pocket plazas’, each hosting specific functions and features that encourage dynamics of social interaction through leisure and play, encouraging visitors to slow down and indulge in memorable experiences. Allocated within the contained plaza platforms are leisure spaces, lush nature, and a wide variety of sport facilities, accompanied by a shaded retail and dining area as an architectural buffer to the busy road behind.

 

In response to the client’s initiative to activate a large portion of the newly inaugurated UAE Beach Corniche to attract both local and international visitors, 100architects’ concept proposes a new urban landmark not only in the UAE but also beyond. The intervention enhances and stimulates, both visually and functionally, the experience of visitors in all senses, turning this section of the emirates’ coastline into one of the main catalyzers of social life in the emirate.

100architects winding pathways and entertainment plazas enliven corniche in sharjah
the colourful swirling paths are a sweeping abstracted expression of the wind

100architects winding pathways and entertainment plazas enliven corniche in sharjah
pocketed plazas within the pathways hosts a range of leisure amenities

100architects freezes the wind of100architects winding pathways and entertainment plazas enliven corniche in sharjah the desert in a system of public elevated pathways 3
the complex also facilitates a pedestrian connection to the urban settlement across the road



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‘sake viva!’ campaign is urging japanese youngsters to drink more


‘sake viva!’ tells japanese youngsters to get drinking

 

Launched recently by the Japanese Tax Agency, ‘Sake Viva!’ is an unusual business contest urging the country’s young people to ditch sobriety for a few more drinks. This unorthodox campaign responds to sharp declines in alcohol consumption over the past few years in Japan, putting a huge dent in tax revenues related to this industry. 

 

It seems that Japanese Millennials and Gen Z do not indulge in drinking as much as their parents. This trend among youngsters especially peaked right after the Covid-19 pandemic hit. Indeed, numbers for alcohol consumption have fallen from 100 liters in 1995 to 75 liters in 2020.

 

Pushing people to drink more is not exactly a power move for a government to stand by, but Japan is worried about making ends meet since its alcohol tax revenues comprise only 1.7% of total revenues today. 

this new campaign is urging young japanese to ditch sobriety for a few more drinks

image © Stephen Chen via Unsplash

 

 

open call for unusual business plans to reverse the trend 

 

Wanting to reverse that trend, the Tax Agency has launched its unorthodox ‘Sake Viva!’ business contest inviting people aged 20 to 39 to propose new ideas to get the young generation drinking again. Proposals include marketing schemes (branding and promotions) and AI-related business plans. In addition to Sake, participants can also focus on selling their peers’ new cravings for beer, whiskey shochu, and regular wine.

 

The open call will be running until September 9, 2022. Winning participants will work alongside experts to develop their business ideas further before presenting them to a selected jury in November 2022.

 

Reactions to this campaign naturally involved outrage and criticism over promoting such a problematic (and potentially dangerous) trend. However, on the other side of the spectrum, pure excitement began to spread across social media, where users began sharing their out-of-the-box suggestions for the ‘Sake Viva!’ campaign. 

this new campaign is urging young japanese to ditch sobriety for a few more drinks

image via Sake Viva! 

this new campaign is urging young japanese to ditch sobriety for a few more drinks

image © Zaji Kanamajina via Unsplash

this new campaign is urging young japanese to ditch sobriety for a few more drinksimage © Xtra, Inc. via Unsplash

this new campaign is urging young japanese to ditch sobriety for a few more drinksimage © Charles Postiaux via Unsplash 

 

 

project info:

 

campaign name: Sake Viva!

launched by: Japanese Tax Agency 

open call until: September 9, 2022 



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electric 1980 comuta-car comes with a six-horsepower motor and multiple batteries


Non-running electric 1980 comuta-car project

 

The car design of the non-running project 1980 Comuta-Car comes equipped with a GE Series DC motor and multiple batteries when a private seller named CluelessCollector acquired it in 2022. The electric automobile manufactured by Commuter Vehicles, Inc. of Sebring, Florida is finished in white with multi-color graphics over black upholstery, and the additional equipment includes steel wheels with Moon-style covers, impact bumpers, a driver-side mirror, sliding side windows, and a heater. Even though the mini-car requires extensive revamping, it might possess value as an electric city car that can be charged in electric charging stations and can be easily parked, thanks to its size. Corrosion clads the underside surfaces and compartments of the non-running project, and the seller says the car has no title as it is registered in a state that does not issue titles for a vehicle of its age.

electric 1980 comuta-car comes with a six-horsepower motor and multiple batteries
images courtesy of private seller CluelessCollector

 

 

Compact car’s true mileage is unknown

 

The steel wheels and their Moon-style covers are dubbed to have been refinished when the car was acquired by private seller CluelessCollector while the replacement Maxxis MA-202 tires were said to have been installed in February 2022. Stepping inside, the interior features a bench seat trimmed in black upholstery with a wood-colored dashboard. The door panels, carpets, and linings continue the black color, a complement to the white exterior of the car. A Vanguard-branded 50-mph speedometer is positioned in front of the wheel, beside the car’s auxiliary gauges, switches, and warning lights. While a five-digit odometer indicates 1,100 miles, the seller writes that the true mileage is unknown. 

electric 1980 comuta-car comes with a six-horsepower motor and multiple batteries
side view of the electric 1980 comuta-car

 

 

Design derived from CitiCar

 

The Comuta-Car follows the footsteps of the CitiCar, which was produced by Sebring-Vanguard from 1974 through 1977, and these mini-electric cars were designed for city use. The company was later acquired by Commuter Vehicles Inc., and in 1979, it renamed the model Comuta-Car. The bodies were constructed of ABS plastic and mounted to an aluminum spaceframe, and this now-sold non-running project is finished in white with multi-color graphics. The seller writes that the car’s additional exterior details include impact bumpers with aftermarket battery covers, a single windshield wiper, a front-mounted antenna, a driver-side mirror, sliding side windows, and quarter panel vents. The seller also believes that if the new owner invests in the repair and renovation of the 1980 Comuta-Car, it can become a road-worthy automobile.

electric 1980 comuta-car comes with a six-horsepower motor and multiple batteries
black upholstery

electric 1980 comuta-car comes with a six-horsepower motor and multiple batteries
close-up of wooden dashboard



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furla progetto italia | the creative hub by GEZA


‘Furla Progetto Italia’ by GEZA: pairing with nature 

 

In the Florentian town of Tavernelle Val di Pesa, at the heart of the Chianti region, emerges Italian luxury brand Furla’s new headquarters completed by architecture studio GEZA. Spanning 18,200 sqm, ‘Furla Progetto Italia’ carefully embeds itself into the rural Tuscan landscape, ‘resulting in an environment celebrating individuals’ well-being in the workspace,’ writes the brand.

 

Balancing between black and white surfaces, the design presents itself as an industrial-like complex with a striking composition of different shapes set at various altitudes visible from the highway. Explaining the decision behind the final layout, GEZA co-founder Stefano Gri says: ‘the landscape […] sets out, delineates and lays down the rules for the design and construction of the architectural volumes’.

 

As for the choice of colors, given the highly texturized and colorized context, the architects couldn’t see the complex coated in anything other than black and white. For one thing, the rhythmic layout of white sun-shading louvers across the entrance volume creates a sense of immateriality amid the very tangible flora. On the other hand, the black surfaces turn different shades once the sun shines, uplifting the overall design with elegant chromatic contrasts. 

amid the tuscan landscape, furla's new base emerges as a striking black & white complex

all images © Fernando Guerra – FG+SG fotografia de arquitectura

 

 

rhythmic patterns, generous glazing, and scenic views 

 

The ‘Furla Progetto Italia’ by GEZA (see more here) comprises three main blocks: one for offices, and two for laboratories and logistics, all designed to integrate into the landscape in the least invasive way. The main entrance, where the brand logo stands tall and proud, recalls the Tuscan villa archetype with its ordered row of cypresses that welcomes visitors and defines the access path. This rhythm repeats onto the facade of the buildings, with black and white lamellas filtering natural light into the workspaces. Complementing the fully opaque material is a generous distribution of glazing across all three blocks. 

 

Thanks to a system of patios and green roofs installed atop the entrance block, visitors and employees get to enjoy stunning views of the sceneries ahead while nature gently finds its way into the architecture.‘Building a large volume like this one that is so lightweight as to fit effortlessly with the sky because the building is really made out of sun-shading louvers and glass is to, in fact, create a filter,’ comments GEZA’s second co-founder Piero Zucchi.

amid the tuscan landscape, furla's new base emerges as a striking black & white complex

‘Furla Progetto Italia’ reveals a pure, black and white color scheme 

 

 

‘Anyone, even the construction guys or the person who works from the most stunning office, literally any staff member can be enlighted by the view of the Chianti landscape that faces the building. Here you see the seasons colors, from any office, from any area of the building,’ he continues. 

amid the tuscan landscape, furla's new base emerges as a striking black & white complex

bold architectural movements set against the rural Tuscan landscape 

 



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mercedes-benz releases behind-the-scenes of project MAYBACH with virgil abloh


Mercedes-benz with virgil abloh

 

Last time, Mercedes–Benz paid homage to the late Virgil Abloh with the launch of a limited-edition bespoke S-Class and capsule collection, inspired by Project MAYBACH. On August 15th, the car company uploaded a short documentary that goes behind the scenes on Project MAYBACH, from the first creation of Mercedes-Maybach to the involvement of Abloh in the process. In 2020, Virgil Abloh and Mercedes-Benz began a long-term collaborative partnership that the car company describes as pushing the boundaries of design. The meeting between Mercedes-Benz Chief Design Officer Gorden Wagener and Abloh brought Project Geländewagen, its car design was inspired by Mercedes-Benz G-Wagon, having art and functionality at its core. Expanding their work together, the team launched their sequel, Project MAYBACH, which began as a car concept.

mercedes-benz releases behind-the-scenes of project maybach with virgil abloh
images and video screenshots courtesy of Mercedes-Benz

 

 

Utility and luxury for project maybach

 

In the Mercedes-Benz video, Virgil Abloh says that the premise was to use two words to drive the rider to a new action. ‘Utility and luxury are usually not used in the same sentence, and the car that we are developing can function as such,’ he says. Wagener chimes in by stating how great it is when two people having different creative approaches and backgrounds come together. He says that Abloh comes from the fields of fashion and art, thus having a natural wealth of knowledge about these and what they touch upon, while he comes from a different industry and possesses different views. The Chief Design officer finds it interesting that they combine their ideas as one.

mercedes-benz releases behind-the-scenes of project maybach with virgil abloh
Mercedes-Benz releases behind-the-scenes of project MAYBACH with Virgil Abloh

 

 

Virgil Abloh’s approach to fashion and art 

 

From early concept to a luxury vehicle ready for outdoor exploration, the documentary takes the viewers to the twists and turns the duo shared to birth the project to life. It gives an overview of their creative process, reminiscing Abloh’s approach to fashion as his styles and techniques come to the surface in the documentary. ‘I do this in fashion. You do one color you really like, then you have to do five more. You have to offer the handbag in five colors. We could do an orange combination, fully move the colors around, then you do a more tonal grey story,’ he says. His hands-on take on the project rehashes the growth of the project, a remembrance of Abloh’s passion that Mercedes-Benz hopes to uphold.

mercedes-benz releases behind-the-scenes of project maybach with virgil abloh
the sketch of the project

mercedes-benz releases behind-the-scenes of project maybach with virgil abloh
details of the car design



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azuma makoto’s monumental botanical sculpture ‘MEXX’ draws from lush mexican jungle


Azuma Makoto unveils ‘MEXX’ at AZULIK UH MAY / SFER IK in Mexico

 

Perched within the Mexican jungle, at the heart of the Yucatan peninsula, the AZULIK UH MAY / SFER IK arts center is home to Azuma Makoto’s latest floral installation ‘MEXX’. Marking Makoto’s largest work to date, the monumental floral sculpture was created in response to the museum’s unique biophilic design and the surrounding wilderness. ‘I wanted to create a biophilic installation in the Mayan jungle and designed MEXX as a medium that creates a dialogue between humanity and nature.’ the Japanese botanical artist revealed in a previous interview with designboom (see more here). 

azuma makoto's monumental botanical sculpture 'MEXX' draws from lush mexican jungle

all images courtesy of Azuma Makoto

 

 

botanical sculpture blooming alongside SERK IK’s architecture 

 

With MEXX, Azuma Makoto delves into the ideas of coexistence and symbiosis. The massive installation is composed of locally sourced materials, just like the museum building which is made with vines, concrete, and fiberglass. Comprised of a massive array of live indigenous flowers, the piece paints a picture of the country’s biological wealth. Throughout the exhibition, which will be on display until early September 2022, the sculpture will bloom and grow within the museum space, further blurring the lines between the man-made and natural worlds.

 

‘As MEXX is composed of all-natural materials, you can feel the power of nature with all your senses and understand that humanity is just one with the natural environment. also, MEXX will continuously evolve as the plants and flowers bloom and grow and then retreat as they wilt over time, simulating our lifecycle.’ the Japanese artist explains.

 

The immersive work also incorporates the Japanese concept of ‘Ma’ or negative space, serving as both a performance and an artefact.  The installation fills in the space of SFER IK’s great architecture and its natural elements, questioning whether an artificial ecosystem can achieve symbiosis and harmonize with nature.  ‘Flowers already represent the complete existence of beauty when they are in nature, so I always keep in mind that my work should not be an imitation of nature; I must create different expressions of beauty.’ Azuma Makoto says. SFER IK and Azuma will donate all living flowers to the local community after dismantling the installation.

azuma makoto's monumental botanical sculpture 'MEXX' draws from lush mexican jungle azuma makoto's monumental botanical sculpture 'MEXX' draws from lush mexican jungle azuma makoto's monumental botanical sculpture 'MEXX' draws from lush mexican jungle azuma makoto's monumental botanical sculpture 'MEXX' draws from lush mexican jungle



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concèntrico surrounds mi pan bakery in mexico with hanging metallic trays and pinewood


mi pan bakery by concèntrico

 

Interdisciplinary collaboration studio Concèntrico designs Mi Pan Bakery in Mexico City as an ode to the bakers and the bakery traditions in Mexico. The cafe-like design of the architecture in Mexico carries a sense of wood-clad construction, thanks to the use of pinewood throughout the space. Before working on the project, the studio analyzed typical Mexican bakeries to understand their values, experiences, and essence and combined their research with the 40-year lifeline of Mi Pan, whose tradition lies in baking for thousands of families throughout generations. The studio likens the visit to the bakery to living the memory of all Mexicans as the space and the creation process reflect the people who visit the location. It also claims that people are not used to buying in stores that invest in design, a finding that nudged the design team to investigate the context. 

 

As the team walked through the streets, they witnessed a uniform pattern in colors and thousands of handmade signs and messages used to identify the individual store. From here, the design phase began. The self-serve layout of Mi Pan retains the original bakery experience and the goal to invite customers to linger in the bakery and carefully select their bread and delicacies to buy and take home without rushing. Around the space and dangling from the ceiling, metallic baking trays link the baking process with the shopping experience and create an instant signature for the bakery. The design makes it clear that everything revolves around the bread and its process, and the team complements these trays with pinewood boards and shelves to add a warm balance to the coldness of the metallic trays.

concèntrico envelops mi pan bakery with hanging metallic trays and pinewood in mexico
images courtesy of Concèntrico | photos by Jose Miguel Gonzalez of Apertura Arquitectónica

 

 

Hanging metallic trays diffuse ambient light

 

Alejandro Peña Villarreal, the Director of Concèntrico, states that the concept of Mi Pan is derived from its kitchen as he and the team conversed with each baker to get the overall vibe of the place. ‘Throughout the bread baking process, trays are used to reflect the freshness of the product, so we incorporate them into the store,’ he says. Ceramic tiles for the terrazzo floor thread the bakery to the local supermarkets and shops that bear the same design, and the design team added the brand’s orange color into the mix to let Mi Pan’s identity stand out on its own. By combining all of these materials, the studio thinks Mi Pan exudes a warm environment without intimidating the customers who visit.

 

While one may think that the metallic trays in the ceiling were added for aesthetic purposes, the studio deflects this by stating that they help lower the scale of the space and reflect the ceiling lighting that creates diffused ambient light. Crossing the other side of the space, the bakery’s display of cakes and other sweets and treats recline in the fridge, a seemingly last invitation to the customers to halt and grab one or two to take home along with their bread. Another feature that marks the openness and airiness of the bakery pivots to the glass-clad four walls, allowing the outside to trespass the inside and vice-versa.

concèntrico envelops mi pan bakery with hanging metallic trays and pinewood in mexico
Concèntrico envelops Mi Pan Bakery with hanging metallic trays and pinewood in Mexico

 

 

Handmade signs for traditions of mexican bakeries

 

The pinewood shelves also gather by spaces to afford customers a spacious walkway without bumping into one another. The sweets and treats are laid down on each metallic tray, out in the open to please the eyes of the customers and immediately piqued their senses with their flavors and aromas. Following the layout of the bakery, the design team installed lateral access from the inside to the coffee shop beside the bakery to form a sense of symmetry and separation as opposed to including the tables and chairs inside the shop. 

 

There, the route begins with the selection of bread and ends at the checkout counter. The space also includes custom-made metallic furniture inspired by designs used in local restaurants in 1980, the year the bakery opened. Handmade signs bakeries within the neighborhood possess appear in Mi Pan as they adorn the walls, each tray bearing its own letter, number, or sign. The studio says that some of the phrases incorporated into the project include ‘always good from dough to crumb’ and ‘40 years later and our bread is still as it always was, authentic. Mi Pan is the bakery that makes real bread.’

concèntrico envelops mi pan bakery with hanging metallic trays and pinewood in mexico
the metallic trays help diffuse ambient light

concèntrico envelops mi pan bakery with hanging metallic trays and pinewood in mexico
the bakery’s checkout counter beside cakes fridge



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