‘unforgotten films’ explores NYC’s under-appreciated landscapes


‘unforgotten films’ by aaron asis & Green Ghost Studios 

 

New York City is one of the world’s most iconic and recognizable cities. Celebrated landmarks like the Statue of Liberty, Empire State Building, Times Square, and the Brooklyn Bridge define its urban landscape — but the city is also home to countless under-appreciated landmarks whose stories have been lost to time. ‘Unforgotten Films’ is a documentary-like project created by NYC artist Aaron Asis and Green Ghost Studios that spotlights and shares the stories of these lesser-known locations, namely its most complex and inaccessible landscapes.

 

‘[…]We want to give people an opportunity to appreciate the complexity and beauty hidden within the city — from the collective voices of government agencies, community organizations, special interest groups, and creative citizens,’ comments Aaron Asis.  

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Unforgotten: New York State Pavilion (Queens, NY)

 

 

from Ellis Island to Hart Island, and more 

 

The ‘Unforgotten Film’ project introduces us to nearly a dozen sites throughout New York City — from Ellis Island to Hart Island — with thematic focuses that range from the American immigration story to the politics of public burials. Each episode focuses on the relationship between public interests, creative advocacy, and governmental actions — to highlight the importance of these sites and demonstrate the ways that creative thinking can help shape future priorities throughout our cities.

 

For example, the ‘Unforgotten: Ellis Island’ episode looks at one of the United States’ most iconic landmarks to share history beyond immigration. Ellis also includes a medical facility and detention center, which was completely abandoned before becoming a great memorial for diversity and immigration. ‘It’s important for us to understand Ellis because there are many stories from all over the world that can help us understand how to deal with our future,’ shares one of the artists featured in the project. 

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Unforgotten: Hart Island (Bronx, NY)

 

 

On the other hand, ‘Unforgotten: Hart Island’ documents the existence of a relatively unknown New York City potters field, which has been in operation since 1868. Specifically, it shows how decades of creative advocacy have finally enabled public access to New York City’s only public burial ground. ‘It’s painfully clear that the people who have been laid to rest on Hart Island deserve so much better,’ states NYC Council Member Corey Johnson.

 

As well as Ellis Island and Hart Island, the documentary features stories on New York State Pavilion, Washington Square Arch, Renwick Ruin, and Fort Totten Water Battery — with films covering Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn Navy Yard, North Brother Island, and the Freedom Tunnel. All these additional features are currently in preparation and will be released soon.

 

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Unforgotten: Renwick Ruin (New York, NY)

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Unforgotten: Ellis Island (New York, NY)

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Washington Square Arch (New York, NY)

 

 

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Fort Totten Water Battery (Queens, NY)

 

 

 

project info:

 

name: Unforgotten Films

co-creators: Aaron Asis, Green Ghost Studios

 

 

designboom has received this project from our DIY submissions feature, where we welcome our readers to submit their own work for publication. see more project submissions from our readers here.

 

edited by: lea zeitoun | designboom



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